Municipal Water Leader
  • Interview

    Aqwise’s Contributions to MBBR Technology

    Aqwise—Wise Water Technologies Ltd. is a global company, based in Israel, that specializes in moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) technology, a wastewater treatment technology that holds strong advantages over competing technologies in certain applications. In addition to creating its own carriers—small, ingeniously designed plastic cylinders with nooks and crannies that provide large amounts of surface area for bacteria and biomass to attach to during the wastewater treatment process—Aqwise has the expertise to help design and operate plants that use these carriers in the best way possible. The company has offices in Europe, Asia, and the Americas and has delivered projects in 55 countries worldwide.  In this interview, Marc Krieger, Aqwise’s vice…

  • Interview

    Mapal’s Floating Fine Bubble Aeration Technology

    Secondary wastewater treatment requires providing oxygen to bacteria in wastewater so that they remove the dissolved contamination from it. Providing this oxygen to the bacteria is called aeration. In general, there are two types of aeration: mechanical surface aeration, which uses a mechanical impeller to spray water into the air and tends to be inefficient and to suffer from maintenance and health and safety issues, and fine bubble aeration, which involves releasing tiny bubbles from diffusers fixed to the bottom of a reactor. The Israeli company Mapal Green Energy, based in Kibbutz Yagur, has come up with a new take on the latter method. Its floating fine bubble aeration (FFBA)…

  • Interview

    Ayala’s Natural Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Ayala is an Israeli company that builds specialized installations similar to artificial wetlands that can treat wastewater to high standards of purity using nothing more than gravity and natural processes. Using a carefully selected combination of natural elements like aquatic plants, gravel, microorganisms, and special natural additives, these Natural Biological Systems (NBS) can be customized to remove different contaminants from water and to purify it to any standard desired. NBS installations can be integrated into urban park spaces, making them suitable for densely populated areas as well as industrial and agricultural zones.  In this interview, Ayala’s chief executive officer (CEO), Eli Cohen, tells Municipal Water Leader about how the NBS…

  • Interview

    Kando: Improving Wastewater Quality Before It Reaches the Treatment Plant

    Wastewater is not just waste—it is a product that will show up downstream, whether it is recycled and immediately reused for irrigation or consumption or it is discharged into a river or ocean, eventually ending up in our taps again. Treating wastewater and discharging it as high-quality, nonpolluted water is important, but it is also difficult. Kando is an Israeli company with an innovative approach to improving wastewater quality. Its software creates a real-time model of the quality of wastewater within a utility’s collection system and can identify and trace pollution events back to their sources. By working to improve the quality of the wastewater they collect, utilities can ease…

  • Interview

    How TAYA Empowers Small Communities to Recycle Their Wastewater

    Wastewater reuse is an increasingly popular source of water for agricultural and domestic use throughout larger municipalities. Yet few small communities can afford to implement and operate the complex treatment technology required for reuse.  An Israeli company, Triple-T, is seeking to change this paradigm with its TAYA technology, a simple, sustainable, and affordable alternative to conventional wastewater reuse that is nearing regulatory approval in Colorado. Smart technologies like TAYA are an integral part of resiliency planning in small communities, reducing dependency on centralized utilities and promoting sustainable growth.  In this interview, Smart Water Group President Ben Perlman tells Municipal Water Leader about how TAYA works and the advantages it holds for…

  • Interview

    The Central Role of the Israel Water Authority

    Israel is an arid nation whose population has quintupled over the last 60 years. This has necessitated bold and creative water resources policies, including the aggressive use of water recycling and desalination. Because water policy touches all aspects of Israeli national life, the Israeli Parliament in 2007 established an independent governmental body, the Israel Water Authority, that is designed to give a seat at the decisionmaking table to representatives from all relevant ministries.  In this interview, the Israel Water Authority’s director general and chairman of the council, Giora Shaham, tells Municipal Water Authority about the distinctive features of Israel’s water policy and the role the Water Authority plays in setting…

  • Interview

    Building Jerusalem’s Fifth Pipeline

    Due to population increase, the city of Jerusalem is reaching the limits of its current water supply. To resolve this issue, Israel’s national water company, Mekorot, is building a 25-mile pipeline, between 80 and 102 inches in diameter, to provide the city with water from both underground sources and desalination plants on the Mediterranean coast. As the water mostly comes from sea level and Jerusalem lies half a mile above sea level, the entire pipeline system must be pressurized at 290 to 580 pounds per square inch (psi) to deliver the water. This enormous project was first envisioned in the 1990s and is finally reaching completion, with the first water…

  • Interview

    SRP’s Precedent-Setting Watershed Management Initiative

    Diverting, storing, and delivering water is the main trade of a major water supplier like the Salt River Project (SRP). But to successfully carry out that mission, it must pay attention to a much wider landscape than that encompassed by its infrastructure and service area. All water comes from somewhere, and that means that SRP has a direct interest in the tracts of forest and wilderness land, much of which is federally owned, that its water flows through on the way to its reservoirs. One challenge is forest management. Without it, forests become unhealthy and overgrown and are susceptible to devastating wildfires that send ash and debris into SRP’s system.…

  • Interview

    Walking All 131 Miles of SRP’s Canal System

    The Salt River Project (SRP) has 131 miles of canals in the Phoenix, Arizona, area, 60 miles of which have public recreational paths alongside them. This year, a group of 23 SRP employees have committed to walk all 131 miles of the canal system, calling their project 131 Can Be Done. In addition to being a healthy challenge, 131 Can Be Done is helping office staff connect with field teams and learn more about how the SRP canal system works on a dayto-day basis. In this interview, Lynn Allen, the manager of the SRP Water Contact Center, and Stephanie Berry, SRP’s manager of water scheduling and field customer service, tell…

  • Interview

    Investigating Inland Indirect Potable Reuse for Norman, Oklahoma

    The City of Norman, Oklahoma, and engineering firm Garver recently secured a $700,000 grant through the Bureau of Reclamation’s Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program for a pilot inland indirect potable reuse (IPR) program. The pilot program aims to determine the viability of using reuse water to supply Lake Thunderbird, the primary source of drinking water for Norman, turning it into a drought-resistant source. In this interview, Garver Water Reuse Practice Leader Michael Watts, who coauthored the successful grant application, explains the motivations and aims of the pilot project and discusses how municipalities can best make use of Title XVI.