Municipal Water Leader
  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader September 2018. Volume 4 Issue 8.
    Flipbook

    Volume 4 Issue 8 September 2018 Urban Improvements

    Most people don’t think about how their municipal water supply system functions until something goes wrong. The job of a municipal water district manager is to ensure that things don’t get to that point. And carrying out that task is something that requires long-term thinking and innovation. In this month’s Municipal Water Leader, we talk to several executives and planners who are working on the longterm tasks of planning for the future and caring for legacy infrastructure. In our cover story, we talk to Tom Kula, the executive director of the North Texas Municipal Water District, which serves two of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country. He’s spent…

  • Interview

    Building Consensus in the Valley of the Sun The Arizona Municipal Water Users Association

    Providing water to the residents and businesses throughout the Valley of the Sun in Arizona is not an easy task. Meeting the varying interests of municipalities and utilities within the metropolitan region requires a unified strategy for water management. In March 1969, the cities of Glendale, Mesa, Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Tempe created the Arizona Municipal Water Users Association (AMWUA) to devise such a strategy. Today, the organization is double its original size and serves as a forum for area leaders to discuss issues, formulate strategy, and advocate for the region’s municipal water interests. Tyler Young, a writer for Municipal Water Leader, spoke with AMWUA Executive Director Warren Tenney about the…

  • Innovator

    Pipe Trek: Deep Trekker’s Hi-Tech Inspection Robots

    Every man-made structure eventually wears out. Municipal pipelines—some of which are more than 100 years old—are no exception. As infrastructure ages, the risk of breaks, cracks, and leaks grows. By conducting frequent routine inspections, cities and municipalities can discover issues before they become serious problems. To make sure that their pipelines meet regulatory requirements and performance standards, cities and municipalities are turning to trenchless technology, including pipe crawlers. Deep Trekker is one company that is developing new ways to make inspections simple, efficient, and more cost effective. Deep Trekker’s pipe crawlers are portable robotic systems with onboard cameras that allow for regular maintenance and inspections on pipes 6 inches in…

  • Innovator

    QuakeWrap’s Futuristic Materials Are Reshaping Pipe Manufacturing

    Mo Ehsani, PhD, PE, SE, the president of QuakeWrap, is on a mission to help irrigators in the United States combat the aging of their infrastructure and use new technologies to advance their water delivery potential. Dr. Ehsani was a professor of civil engineering at the University of Arizona when he began his pioneering work with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) technology in the late 1980s. FRP is composed of a polymer (such as epoxy, vinyl ester, or polyester) that is reinforced with a fiber (such as carbon, glass, Kevlar, or basalt). The fiber is the main source of strength and stiffness for FRP. In the most commonly used application of FRP,…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader July/August 2018. Volume 4 Issue 7.
    Flipbook

    Volume 4 Issue 7 July/August 2018 Decisionmaking for the Long Term

    Most people don’t think about how their municipal water supply system functions until something goes wrong. The job of a municipal water district manager is to ensure that things don’t get to that point. And carrying out that task is something that requires long-term thinking and innovation. In this month’s Municipal Water Leader, we talk to several executives and planners who are working on the longterm tasks of planning for the future and caring for legacy infrastructure. In our cover story, we talk to Tom Kula, the executive director of the North Texas Municipal Water District, which serves two of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country. He’s spent…

  • Interview

    Developing Multipurpose Solutions for Atlanta’s Historic Fourth Ward Park Robby Bryant of HDR, Inc.

    Storm rainfall can be a nightmare for municipalities with combined sewer systems, causing water accumulation in unwanted areas, overflows along streets, and localized flooding. Such was the case for the City of Atlanta in the early 2000s. The city struggled to accommodate unpredictable pressure during storm events, which often caused combined sewer overflows in and around the Fourth Ward neighborhood. While the city was initially planning to fix the sewer capacity problem by laying more pipe via a tunnel extension of the sewer system, concerned citizens petitioned the city to investigate another idea that would transform the blighted industrial lowland into an urban green space and public park with built-in…

  • Interview

    Just Add Water The Smoky Hill River Renewal Project's Key to Reviving a City’s Spirit

    Historic photos of Salina, Kansas, show a city different from the one many would recognize today. Before the 1960s, the Smoky Hill River flowed through the town, providing a place for the city’s residents and visitors to gather, fish, and enjoy themselves. The river also powered several grain mills, making it a key economic driver for the community. However, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a flood control levee, it restricted water flow and strangled the river. The once-flowing river soon filled with sediment and debris, becoming an eyesore for the town. Friends of the River, a local grassroots non-profit organization, began organizing in 2007 to inspire local…

  • Interview

    Water Is Life The Case for Streamlined Permitting

    Booming population growth is the dream for many municipalities throughout the United States because it increases residential development, business activity, and the tax base. Population growth can also present challenges, however, for municipalities with limited water supplies. There are consequences when population growth occurs faster than new water supplies can be developed. Just northeast of Dallas, Texas, the North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) is facing such growing pains. In the early 2000s, the NTMWD established a plan to accommodate an ever-increasing population. A new reservoir would be built beginning in the year 2020 to capture and store water from the Bois d’Arc Creek. But a long permitting process, requests…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader June 2018. Volume 4 Issue 6.
    Flipbook

    Volume 4 Issue 6 June 2018 Collaborating on Water

    Municipal water supply, flood control, and growthrelated issues are extraordinarily complex challenges that require visionary leadership and creative funding to solve. This issue of Municipal Water Leader magazine highlights long-term water supply efforts in Utah and successful flood control work in California. Additionally, in this issue we speak with key individuals who have been highly effective through their collaboration efforts. Gene Shawcroft, general manager of the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, discusses the district area’s growth, the challenges the district is facing, and how Utah water districts are preparing to meet goals set out by Utah Governor Gary Herbert for projected water needs in 2060. Congresswoman Doris Matsui shares her…

  • Interview,  Manager Profile

    Continuing a Legacy in the Upper Colorado Region Upper Colorado Regional Director Brent Rhees

    The western United States has experienced drought for many years. In fact, 2018 has been one of the worst drought years on record. With population levels estimated to double and even triple by 2050 in some western states, water supply issues continue to be a major concern. Reclamation’s Upper Colorado Region has long dealt with drought, providing water through even the worst drought conditions, and it plans to do so for many years to come. Tyler Young, writer for Municipal Water Leader, spoke with Upper Colorado Regional Director Brent Rhees about the region’s water supply future, current challenges, and potential outcomes for western irrigators