Municipal Water Leader
  • Interview

    Joining the Northwest Pipe Family An Interview with Erin Cornwell

    In July 2018, Northwest Pipe Company acquired Ameron Water Transmission Group, reinforcing its position as the United States’ largest manufacturer of water transmission steel pressure pipe. Erin Cornwell is an engineer who worked in a number of different departments at Ameron Water Transmission Group and now works for Northwest Pipe. In this interview with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill, Ms. Cornwell discusses her work, developments in the steel pipe industry, and her experiences during the recent acquisition.

  • Interview

    How Wellntel is Providing Groundwater Supply Information

    Farmers can observe the weather, they can measure rainfall, and they can monitor how much water they pump out of their wells, but until now, it has been nearly impossible to measure their groundwater supply in real time. Groundwater is a dynamic resource that recovers from pumping at different speeds, depending on geology, precipitation, and the number and density of the wells that draw from it. Wellntel, a technology company founded in 2012, has created a cloud-based platform that provides real-time groundwater supply information from a network of simple sensors installed on private wells. In this interview, Marian Singer, the cofounder and chief executive officer of Wellntel, talks with Municipal…

  • Interview

    Managing Storm Water in Los Angeles County

    Los Angeles is associated with sunny skies, but when storms come, the water they bring can be difficult to manage in the city’s dense urban landscape. Since 2015, the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts (LACSD) have been legally permitted to aid their member jurisdictions with storm water management. Today, the Districts are figuring out safe and efficient ways to introduce storm water into their sewer systems and treat it to meet water quality standards. In this interview, Kristen Ruffell, the division engineer for the LACSD’s Water Quality Section, speaks with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about recent advances in storm water management in Los Angeles.

  • Interview

    Forecasting Fort Worth’s Water Resources Needs

    T he Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD) has been providing flood control and water supply services to the city of Fort Worth, Texas, for nearly 100 years. In a swiftly growing urban area that has experienced significant dry and wet spells over the past 4 years, it is imperative to be able to forecast future supply and demand and to plan on that basis. As TRWD’s water resources engineering director, Rachel Ickert oversees energy and water supply management as well as flood control operations for the district. In this interview with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill, Ms. Ickert discusses her department’s responsibilities and how the department integrates the…

  • Interview

    Embracing Opportunities in Water A Conversation with Cheryl Zittle of the Salt Water River Project

    T he Salt River Project (SRP), founded in 1903, provides water and power to over 1 million customers in the Phoenix, Arizona, metro region, including both agricultural and urban water users. Cheryl Zittle is the senior director of water services for SRP. She oversees delivery operations, engineering, information technology, construction and maintenance, and customer service, as well as accounting and contract administration for water. As of 2019, Ms. Zittle is also the president of the National Water Resources Association (NWRA), a federation of state associations and caucuses representing a broad spectrum of water supply interests. In this interview with Municipal Water Leader Editor-in-Chief Kris Polly, Ms. Zittle discusses her career…

  • Interview

    Chairwoman Gloria Gray Leadership for California's Water Future

    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a cooperative public agency composed of 14 cities, 11 municipal water districts, and 1 county water authority that, combined, provide water to about 19 million people across a densely populated 5,200-square-mile service area. The district was founded in 1928 and is headquartered in Los Angeles. In October 2018, Metropolitan’s board of directors elected Gloria Gray to be the district’s next chair. In this interview with Municipal Water Leader Editor-in-Chief Kris Polly, Chairwoman Gray discusses her background in water policy leadership and her top priorities for Metropolitan.

  • Interview

    Providing Water Amid Fire

    Las Virgenes Municipal Water District (LVMWD) serves around 70,000 people in a biologically diverse mountain ecosystem northwest of Los Angeles, California. In November 2018, the district was hit by the disastrous Woolsey wildfire, which burned 66 percent of the district’s service area. The staff of the water district worked to maintain the functionality of its infrastructure while also providing water to firefighters. In this interview, Dave Pedersen, the district’s general manager, Dave Roberts, its resource conservation manager, and Mike McNutt, its public affairs and communications manager, speak with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about the Woolsey Fire’s effects on LVMWD’s service area, infrastructure, and local ecosystem.

  • Interview

    The Advantages of the P3 Model A Conversation With Scott Parrish

    Vista Ridge, a major project that will supply the city of San Antonio, Texas, with water for the next 30 years, is the largest municipal public-private partnership (P3) project in the United States. Garney Construction, a company with long-standing expertise in laying water pipeline, is currently the majority owner and developer of the project and has taken out loans totaling nearly a billion dollars to build it. In this interview with Municipal Water Leader Editor-in-Chief Kris Polly, Scott Parrish, the president of Garney Construction, tells us about the company, the status of the Vista Ridge project, and the advantages and unique challenges of the P3 funding model.

  • Interview

    Providing Water to the Navajo Nation The Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project

    The Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project is a major construction project being undertaken by the Bureau of Reclamation as part of the 2005 Navajo Nation Water Rights Settlement Agreement. With 300 miles of pipeline, two water treatment plants, 19 pumping plants, and numerous storage tanks spread across an area the size of New Jersey, the project will bring a clean and reliable surface-water supply to members of the Navajo Nation, some of whom currently do not have water directly delivered to their homes, as well as to beneficiaries in the Jicarilla Apache Nation and the City of Gallup. Patrick Page, a deputy construction engineer with the Bureau of Reclamation, spoke with…

  • Interview

    Meeting Fort Worth’s Growing Demand The Integrated Pipeline Project

    The Tarrant Regional Water District has been providing flood-control and water supply services to the city of Fort Worth, Texas, for nearly 100 years. The rapid growth of Fort Worth and its sister city, Dallas, has necessitated the construction of ambitious new reservoir and pipeline projects. Most recently, Tarrant Regional Water District and the City of Dallas have collaborated on the immense Integrated Pipeline (IPL) project, which is projected to supply 350 million gallons of water per day to Fort Worth, Dallas, and other water users. In this interview, Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill speaks with Alan Thomas, the deputy general manager of the Tarrant Regional Water District,…