Municipal Water Leader
  • Interview

    How Eastern Provides Recycled Water to Wetlands, Farms, Power Plants, and More

    Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD) provides water, wastewater, and recycled water service to more than 825,000 people in Riverside County, California. Since the 1960s, the district has been supplementing its largely imported water supply by developing wastewater reclamation and recycling projects. Currently, recycled water represents about 34 percent of its portfolio and is delivered to agricultural, industrial, institutional, and environmental users.  In this interview, Joe Mouawad, assistant general manager of EMWD, speaks with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about how EMWD’s recycled water is benefiting ratepayers and the local environment as a whole. 

  • Interview

    Pentair: Water Reuse From Stadiums to Factories to Private Homes

    Pentair, a global company with its main U.S. office in Minneapolis, has recently refocused its efforts squarely on the water sector. The company’s water technology has broad applications in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. Pentair also helped the Minnesota Twins achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for their new baseball stadium with an innovative, facility-scale rainwater capture and reuse installation as well as purified drinking water stations.  In this interview, Phil Rolchigo, Pentair’s chief technology officer, speaks with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about Pentair’s history, its project at Target Field, and its vision for the future. 

  • Interview

    Demonstrating the Feasibility of Large-Scale Reuse in Southern California

    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a major water wholesaler that serves 26 member agencies across 6 heavily populated counties. Most of its water is imported from the Colorado River and Northern California, but increasing drought and demand have highlighted the limitations of these sources. For decades, Metropolitan has encouraged and incentivized its member agencies to develop local water supplies. Now, it is following suit, embarking on the development of a major recycled water project for the region, a drought-proof supply that could ultimately produce 150 million gallons a day (MGD) of recycled wastewater for groundwater augmentation, industrial uses and, eventually, direct potable reuse through raw water augmentation.…

  • Interview

    San Diego’s Pure Water Program

    San Diego’s public utilities provide drinking water to around 1.3 million people—and rely primarily on imported water to do so. Recent years of shortage, high prices, and mandatory restrictions have highlighted the vulnerability of this water source and inspired the city to invest in an ambitious, 20-year project to create a local reuse source. The Pure Water project will ultimately provide 83 million gallons a day (MGD) of indirect potable reuse water. In this interview, Amy Dorman, deputy director of San Diego’s Public Utilities Department, speaks with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about the motivations behind Pure Water, how the city is paying for the project, and the…

  • Interview

    How IPM Can Help Water Utilities With Personnel Transitions

    When a high-level manager moves on to a new job, a municipal water agency may find itself caught flat-footed. It usually takes 4–5 months to replace a high-level manager or executive, and in the meantime, an agency may struggle to smoothly fulfil the departed employee’s functions. This is the problem that Tim Pickering aimed to solve when he founded Interim Public Management (IPM). IPM has a network of over 200 experienced associates who can fill these positions while a company carries out the search for a permanent replacement. In this interview, Tim Pickering, president and chief executive officer of IPM, speaks with Municipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about his…

  • Interview

    How Municipal Water Districts Can Work With FEMA

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is the U.S. government agency charged with coordinating disaster response at a scale that goes beyond the capacities of local or state governments. The agency provides on-the-ground recovery efforts in coordination with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other federal and local agencies and also provides state and local governments with expert advice, funding, and training. In this interview with Municipal Water Leader, a FEMA spokesperson highlighted the planning resources that FEMA has prepared for local government entities and explained how municipalities and municipal water districts can best work with FEMA.

  • Interview

    Green Water Infrastructure for Chicago

    The Chicago Department of Water Management provides water and sewer service to over 5 million people in the greater Chicago area. Though much of its water infrastructure dates back to the 19th century, its major infrastructure revitalization and environmental initiatives earned the Department of Water Management a 2018 Sustainable Water Utility Management Award from the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies. In this interview, Randy Conner, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Water Management, speaks withMunicipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about how his agency is building a stronger, more efficient, and cleaner water system for the city.

  • Interview

    Fighting Floodwater in Arkansas

    On May 25, 2019, the crest of a record-breaking flood on the Arkansas River entered the state of Arkansas in Sebastian County. Caused by heavy rainfall in the Oklahoma region, the flood would overtop and breach several levees, causing damage to public and private property, severely disrupting freight traffic on the river, and posing a risk to private well water. The Arkansas Department of Emergency Management (ADEM) was the agency in charge of the response. In this interview, ADEM Director A.J. Gary speaks withMunicipal Water Leader Managing Editor Joshua Dill about the historic flood and the coordinated response that his agency has led.

  • Interview

    How New York City Is Learning From Hurricane Sandy

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit New York City. It was the most serious hurricane to hit New York in many years, flooding large parts of the city, damaging buildings and roads, and knocking out power. The hurricane posed significant challenges to New York’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), particularly to its wastewater treatment infrastructure. Many of its wastewater resource recovery facilities and pump stations lost power or were damaged by the storm surge. DEP’s Alan Cohn, the managing director for integrated water management, Colin Johnson, an account manager with the capital construction bureau, and Tara Deighan, a deputy press secretary, speak with Municipal Water LeaderManaging Editor Joshua Dill about DEP’s…

  • Interview

    Recovering and Rebuilding After Hurricane Katrina

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New Orleans District is responsible for maintaining navigation, reducing flood risks, and restoring ecosystems in the distinctive landscape of southern Louisiana. With the mighty Mississippi and its yearly floods on one side and the Gulf of Mexico with its hurricanes on the other, New Orleans faces special challenges. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the New Orleans District played a central role in the city’s recovery and in the rebuilding of its levees and storm defenses. In this interview, Colonel Michael Clancy, who served as district commander of the New Orleans District from June 2016 to June 2019, speaks with Municipal Water LeaderManaging Editor Joshua Dill…