Municipal Water Leader
  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader September 2018. Volume 4 Issue 8.
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    Volume 4 Issue 8 September 2018 Urban Improvements

    Most people don’t think about how their municipal water supply system functions until something goes wrong. The job of a municipal water district manager is to ensure that things don’t get to that point. And carrying out that task is something that requires long-term thinking and innovation. In this month’s Municipal Water Leader, we talk to several executives and planners who are working on the longterm tasks of planning for the future and caring for legacy infrastructure. In our cover story, we talk to Tom Kula, the executive director of the North Texas Municipal Water District, which serves two of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country. He’s spent…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader July/August 2018. Volume 4 Issue 7.
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    Volume 4 Issue 7 July/August 2018 Decisionmaking for the Long Term

    Most people don’t think about how their municipal water supply system functions until something goes wrong. The job of a municipal water district manager is to ensure that things don’t get to that point. And carrying out that task is something that requires long-term thinking and innovation. In this month’s Municipal Water Leader, we talk to several executives and planners who are working on the longterm tasks of planning for the future and caring for legacy infrastructure. In our cover story, we talk to Tom Kula, the executive director of the North Texas Municipal Water District, which serves two of the top five fastest-growing cities in the country. He’s spent…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader June 2018. Volume 4 Issue 6.
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    Volume 4 Issue 6 June 2018 Collaborating on Water

    Municipal water supply, flood control, and growthrelated issues are extraordinarily complex challenges that require visionary leadership and creative funding to solve. This issue of Municipal Water Leader magazine highlights long-term water supply efforts in Utah and successful flood control work in California. Additionally, in this issue we speak with key individuals who have been highly effective through their collaboration efforts. Gene Shawcroft, general manager of the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, discusses the district area’s growth, the challenges the district is facing, and how Utah water districts are preparing to meet goals set out by Utah Governor Gary Herbert for projected water needs in 2060. Congresswoman Doris Matsui shares her…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader May 2018. Volume 4 Issue 5.
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    Volume 4 Issue 5 May 2018 The Storm Water Issue

    For municipal water providers and managers, especially those with combined systems, storm water is a source of significant water quantity and quality concern. Residents and business owners rely on municipalities and public works departments to move storm water away from their property. At the same time, flows created by storm events pick up pollutants across impervious surfaces and move them into drains and, eventually, lakes and rivers. That stresses treatment systems and recreational opportunities. In this issue of Municipal Water Leader, we focus on the latest solutions for integrating storm water into holistic water management solutions. In our cover interview, we talk with Dr. Poonam Kalkat, director of public utilities…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader April 2018. Volume 4 Issue 4.
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    Volume 4 Issue 4 April 2018 The Army Corps Issue

    The work of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is woven into the web of American waterways and water bodies. From harbors and levees, to flood control dams and check structures, to ecosystem restoration projects and reservoir operations, the Army Corps has a nexus with water projects across the country. Given the breadth of the Army Corps’ reach and its instrumental role in permitting water infrastructure projects, this issue of Municipal Water Leader is dedicated both to the work of the Army Corps and its nonfederal project sponsors—the water agencies and flood control districts that work hand in hand with the agency to maintain and develop the nation’s waterways and…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader March 2018. Volume 4 Issue 3.
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    Volume 4 Issue 3 March 2018 One Water in Tennessee

    While relatively abundant in surface water, the state of Tennessee still has water supply challenges. The drought of 2007 stressed a lot of municipal water systems, hitting rural water systems particularly hard. In addition, the state’s population is expected to double in the next 50 years, and for the state’s municipal water providers, that means planning ahead to accommodate that growth in a sustainable manner. It also means accounting for water supplies as integrated resources and managing accordingly. Nashville Water Metro Services (WMS) dates back to 1831. The department is uniquely situated to address its aging infrastructure and growing population. It has embraced a one-water philosophy, providing drinking water, wastewater,…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader February 2018. Volume 4 Issue 2.
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    Volume 4 Issue 2 February 2018 The Infrastructure Issue

    In February, the President introduced the administration’s infrastructure plan, which includes financing and regulatory streamlining mechanisms for water projects. Here in Washington, DC, Congress is weighing several proposals to rehabilitate and expand the nation’s water infrastructure through existing and new programs. We welcome these proposals, but regardless of whether they move forward, water agencies continue to modernize and improve their systems. In this issue of Municipal Water Leader, we highlight successful water projects and the people building them. This year, the Orange County Water District (OCWD) is commemorating the 10th anniversary of its Groundwater Replenishment System (GWRS), the world’s largest potable reuse project. The GWRS provides a critical source of…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader January 2018. Volume 4 Issue 1.
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    Volume 4 Issue 1 January 2018 Water Management in Extreme Storm Events

    For water managers, the calm before the storm is a time for preparation. In 2017, the water and wastewater agencies of southern Texas were put to the test by Hurricane Harvey. Some of them experienced 20,000-year flood levels. It is no surprise that those agencies helped to ensure that drinking water and wastewater services continued at a time when so many individuals and families lost so much. In this issue of Municipal Water Leader magazine, we speak to managers at the Gulf Coast Authority (GCA), Houston Water, the San Jacinto River Authority (SJRA), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps) about their respective experiences during the storm and…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader November/December 2017. Volume 3 Issue 10.
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    Volume 3 Issue 10 November/December 2017 Maximizing a Limited Resource: A Look at Colorado River Management

    In this issue of Municipal Water Leader, we share some stories about the lifeblood of the Southwest, the Colorado River. Millions of lives spanning two countries and seven states depend of the successful management of the river’s waters. Water managers on the river work within a complex web of rights, agreements, and shared responsibilities within the greater framework of the Law of the River. Dr. Terry Fulp lives and breathes the Colorado River. As the Lower Colorado Regional Director of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, he carries out the secretary of the Interior's role as watermaster of the Lower Colorado River, ensuring the delivery of 9 million acre-feet of water…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Municipal Water Leader October 2017. Volume 3 Issue 9.
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    Volume 3 Issue 9 October 2017 Leading the Way in Milwaukee

    In this issue of Municipal Water Leader, we speak to leaders who have helped to position the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as a worldwide leader in water technology. Not only is the city situated near an abundance of fresh water in Lake Michigan, but the industries that historically served as catalysts for Milwaukee’s growth— brewing, dairy, and forestry—relied heavily on water for production or transportation. Today, companies like Badger Meter, A.O. Smith, and Rexnord call Milwaukee home and have collaborated to foster new water technology innovations under the auspices of The Water Council. Innovation in the city is not limited to water technology—it extends to management. Kevin Shafer manages the…